Trial Strategies

6/11/2016 ~ I need a lawyer for the trial because I have a brain injury. I’ve lost half my processing speed and half my working memory. That means I’m S L O W. There’s no way I could be allowed enough time within a trial to actually formulate answers and questions.

To find a lawyer I wrote to UNM Law School faculty, asking for recommendations. That didn’t turn up a lawyer who would help me with the upcoming trial because the two recommended lawyers insisted that I agree to settle, else they wouldn’t take my case. LOL. I mean, seriously, if I was going to settle I likely wouldn’t need a lawyer. Though, I already paid $3,600 to Ana Garner who I thought would be good because she wrote the Amici Curiae Brief in Bank of New York v. Romero. In actual fact, I would have been better off saving the money, except I felt good having done what I thought the Court thought I should do, re my participation in Mediation.

.

.

What was super good about my strategy of writing to UNM Law School faculty was reading their profiles and the papers mentioned in their profiles.

I forget which profile mentioned NITA. I’d not heard of it so I googled and found an informative website. NITA, it turns out, is the National Institute of Trial Advocacy. It’s easy to join, and they didn’t throw me out when I owned up to being pro se.

Early on I signed up for a web presentation on Trial Strategies. I was amazed at what I learned. For example some of the things I’d been doing were not “ideal”, so say the least, and in fact were likely to irritate the judge. You can watch the presentation if you register, which is free. Watch Trial Strategies.

I highly recommend watching. Sign up. Watch.